Vintage Petrology

When antiquing this week, I found this Webster’s notebook.


Just to be a little artsy and to have a better background to photograph it against, I leaned it up against a big old rock in my flower bed.

Looks better than just laying on the kitchen table don’t you think?


Later I opened the notebook and noticed there was writing in it. About rocks! How weird is that? It’s about rocks and I had it sitting against a rock!


So I took it back outside and set up a little scientific looking vignette for it.


But before I go any further, isn’t this handwriting beautiful? They used to teach cursive handwriting in school and you were graded on how you made your letters. At some point in High School my handwriting took on a life of its own. I don’t think I could make a proper S anymore if I wanted to.


Here are some of the tools I displayed with the notebook:

A rusty compass,


an old slide rule


and some watch repair tools.

Wait…watch repair tools? My husband was out of the house when I stole borrowed all these items out of his desk and took the photos. I had no idea what the thing in the box was, just thought it looked cool.


This is my vintage Webster’s Dictionary from 1903. I bought this probably 20 years ago in an antique store in Oregon.

A Webster’s Dictionary to go with a Webster’s Notebook – notice the correlation there.


See, there’s Noah Webster himself looking all dapper with his flowing wavy hair.


It has some cool drawings in it.


I’ve been trying out some Picnik effects. All the photos in this post were done with the Orton-ish effect with Bloom and Fade at 20% and Brightness at between 40-50% (depending on the photo).

I could easily spend my life tweaking photos with Picasa and Picnik. It’s addictive!


In case you were going to Google it, Petrology is the study of rocks – igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic. It’s a specific branch of Geology. (And I didn’t know any of that until I Googled “the study of rocks”).

I am linking with My Romantic Home’s Show and Tell Friday.

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Comments

  1. says

    Ohhh…that is soooo cool, Pam. I won’t let MyHero see this because now (in his 2nd childhood) he has taken up collecting rocks and would covet your notebook…seriously drooooool all over my computer screen looking at it. That is a great find and I love how you displayed it! hugs- Diana

  2. says

    What a fun litle treasure you’ve found! And my first impression was definitely, “What beautiful handwriting!”

    I am so glad you liked my teacup topiary, and please let me know if you make one–I would love to see it!

    Kelly

  3. says

    Hi Pam! What a cool find and inspired setting! I love old books and gadgets & such. I hope you’re having a wonderful weekend!

    : )

    Julie M.

    ps That handwriting IS lovely…I have terrible penmanship!

  4. says

    What a fun find and what fun making your vignette. I love looking at peoples handwriting. I have been trying to use cursive more and working to make it legible. I love handwritten journals and letters, your post was fun to read and look at.

  5. says

    Love this Pam. I love how that blue book looks and I am in the same boat, my handwriting has it’s own style(that sounds better than problem, right?) Thanks for leaving your two cents, I appreciate it and even if I can’t get an e-mail from you, I just appreciate being able to leave you a comment:) So glad I know you Pam:)

  6. says

    Pam-

    You find the coolest stuff! I also love the old-fashioned handwriting. I always thought maybe it was because they had to use fountain pens, and it took more patience. Lovely vignette you’ve set up! Your old dictionary is something I’d really love to thumb through! Great photos.

    -Pam

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